hyperallergic:

(via Using Artist Statement Generators to Make Art)
Early last year, I wrote a blog post about the best artist statement generator I’ve seen, which lets you plug in biographical information as well as the media and themes of your work before it whips up an appropriately grandiloquent text for you. A commenter on that post, writer and curator Danny Olda, responded by suggesting that it might be interesting to generate artwork based on the statement rather than the other, more traditional way around.
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This is very cool for anyone interested in the combination of chance, indeterminacy and the potential of digital processes.

hyperallergic:

(via Using Artist Statement Generators to Make Art)

Early last year, I wrote a blog post about the best artist statement generator I’ve seen, which lets you plug in biographical information as well as the media and themes of your work before it whips up an appropriately grandiloquent text for you. A commenter on that post, writer and curator Danny Olda, responded by suggesting that it might be interesting to generate artwork based on the statement rather than the other, more traditional way around.

READ MORE

This is very cool for anyone interested in the combination of chance, indeterminacy and the potential of digital processes.

Reblogged from hyperallergic

At the core of Surrealist aesthetics, the marvellous was sometimes revealed rather than created. Always on the look-out for quirks of fate in everyday life, the artists sought this notion in the most unexpected places, in the banality, even triviality, of everyday life. The relationship between Realism and Surrealism was gradually transformed, showing that the surreal could be an inherent part of reality itself. The real and the marvellous became “connected vessels” as André Breton put it. From that point, the frontiers between work of art and document became blurred, the artist turned into a wanderer, a collector of “finds”, of “petrifying coincidences”, incessantly questioning the familiar order to unearth its “bewildering strangeness.”

La Subversion des Images, surréalisme, photographie, film -  Pompidou Centre exhibition catalogue

An average bedaubed wall revealed to Brassaï, like Freud with his fantasy about the excavation of Rome, the long, grimy history of human imagination, which, of course, generates our dreams. Here, he claimed, are ‘the origins of writing’, and of the image-making power: we can see man first defining himself by scratching a replica of his body or, if he’s a contemporary adolescent with a can of spray-paint, signing his tag.

The graffiti Brassaï concentrated on reiterated that union of love and death which he found in the nocturnal city (and which the man in the fog presumably reflects on as he studies the poster for Tristan with its ecstatic love-death). Any gouged cavity in a stone surface serves as a female orifice, towards which pronged male arrows speed. But the scabs, scars and creeping damp of ancient, putrid stone announce what follows this gruff consummation: ‘Decomposition, annihilation, and [as Brassaï added with the necrophilia of the true surrealist] adventure.

Where there’s muck, there’s Brassaï

 The Observer, Sunday 25 February 2001

You find photographs in so many different ways – from chance encounters, from looking at your negatives, from the way the light hits your pillow in your home, from a sound or a movement that makes you look… It’s whatever draws you or makes you feel something. Then, the picture is only good if it has a life of its own. Every photo is almost a fiction or a dream. If it’s really good, it’s another form of life.

Sylvia Plachy (via pixfeedla)

(via amyharrity)

Source pixfeedla

Reblogged from pixfeedla

David Shrigley’s photographs are witty, and often slightly disturbing, interventions in public pace. One of his strategies is to write a note and attach it to an existing object that he finds on his walks through the city. These notes make reference to alienation, loss and damage but, in doing so, transform ugly or mundane material into enagaging and thought-provoking visual delights. 

It could be argued that this approach is inspired by the Situationist International, a group of artists and writers working in France in the 1960s. Critical of the effects of capitalism, especially on the experience of urban life. These activists sought to undermine the culture of the “spectacle”, the tendency for people to consume commodities instead of being satisfied with lived experience, by creating “moments of life deliberately constructed for the purpose of reawakening and pursuing authentic desires, experiencing the feeling of life and adventure, and the liberation of everyday life.” They were interested in concepts like psychogeography, drifting through the urban landscape and an attitude of playfulness. 

Shrigley’s interventions (and photographic documents) are his way of creating such situations, moments of surprise and delight, out of the ordinary materials of urban life. 

How could you respond to Shrigley’s work in the creating of situations in school?